Drag Bars, Sprocket Cover removal.

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, Drag Bars, Sprocket Cover removal.

Installing the Drag Bars

 

One of the most significant changes shifting from the 675 to the Nightster was handlebar position. The 675 was a sportsbike – so had clipons the combined with the rearset footpegs nearly put your rear end above your hand position. This resulted in a very aggressive but somewhat uncomfortable riding position.

Switching over to what is essentially a cruiser, I liked being a bit more upright, but the standard bars were a little too far back. With my ape length arms, I was nearly beyond horizontal, so had to push/pull myself forward to fight the wind. While I was tempted to put clipons onto the bike, I didn’t really feel the need to go that far, so the Drag Bars were a nice in-between.

Fitting them was relatively straightforward. While I originally intended to record fitting the bars, it took me a little longer to put them on than expected – mainly through not thinking the process through fully before starting and having to double back multiple times with taking the switches off, then back off, then back on, then off and back on again. Eventually, I got the wiring and brake line position sorted, and bolted it all back together.

I am going to leave them as they are for the moment, but now the bar is on, it’s a simple procedure to loosen up the clamps and adjust the bar up or down – I am keen to try a couple of slightly different positions just to see how they feel. It certainly looks the part, but now I am just keener than ever to get the speedo off the bars and relocated down to one side.

, Drag Bars, Sprocket Cover removal.

Removing the Sprocket Cover

Again, a simple exercise – thought I had to take the top exhaust pipe back off to make things a bit easier. Reading online, the general consensus seems to be that it might cause a rock or the like to get into the belt and cause damage – though all the peoples spreading the concern have never actually had it happen to them. I am not going to have a pillion on the back of this bike – so that wasn’t a concern. If the belt does go, well, it might just be motivation to convert the bike over to a chain, because, well just because.

 

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